Next Honolulu Festival comes March 12-14, 2021

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Sake & Food Fest to be held during the 26th Honolulu Festival

Spreading the Japanese sake culture from Hawaii to the world A long-awaited Sake & Food Fest will take place in Hawaii Convention Center on March 7 (Sat.) and 8 (Sun.). Japanese sake, which refers to not only rice wine but also shochu and awamori (Okinawan alcohol), is a part of unique Japanese culture. With its mission to facilitate cultural exchange in mind, Honolulu Festival will host the Sake & Food Fest in order to introduce the appeals of sake, as well as delicious food to be enjoyed with, to people from around the world. The event is split into two areas: In the Learning Zone, you get to know the history of sake in Japan displayed on large panels. The panels also feature the history of sake making in Hawaii. Sake has been around in Hawaii since the 1880s, and it is documented that King Kalākaua had a taste of it. Although sake was an imported luxury back then, Japanese immigrants succeeded in brewing their own sake in Hawaii a few decades later, and sake breweries started popping up on Oahu and the Big Island. The Learning Zone exhibitions will tell you the little-known history of hard work and efforts that were put into making sake in Hawaii. Another exhibition introduces 3 different types of sake (rice wine, shochu and awamori), as well as their ingredients and distillation processes. There is also a chart of various types of sake categorized based on their flavors, so that you can pick your favorite along with food pairings. Just like how you learn to pick your food according to your choice of wine, the exhibition will improve your “sake literacy.” There are also brochures prepared by the Japan Sake & Shochu Makers Association, as well as video clips on sake making. After you get to know your sake better, it’s time to taste it! in the Experience Zone, four popular breweries from Japan share the appeals of their sake at their booths: Sanwa Shurui (maker of Iichiko), Takahashi Shuzo (Shiragaku Shiro), Kikusui Shuzo (Kikusui), and Takara Shuzo (Sho Chiku Bai). There are also other booths where you can have free delicious samples of 68 brands of sake brewed across Japan, from Hokkaido to Okinawa. Don’t miss the re-debut of made-in-Hawaii sake! Sake-making culture in Hawaii, nurtured and protected by Japanese immigrants, has been gone since the last brewery closed its doors 33 years ago without any successors. In this year, however, the Island Sake Brewery in the Kakaako district revived the culture with their made-in-Hawaii sake. Their sake uses fine-quality rice from Omachi, Okayama, and their Junmai Ginjo sake will make a debut at the Sake & Food Fest with limited samples! Next to the sake sampling booths is the delicious food corner that can be enjoyed with sake. You can experience delightful pairings of local dishes and Japanese sake, and get a sense of traditional Japanese summer festivals. [About Sake & Food Fest] Venue: 1st floor, Hawaii Convention Center Organizer: Honolulu Festival Foundation Sponsor: Japan Sake & Shochu Makers Association Dates: 10AM-6PM on March 7 (Sat.) and 10AM-3PM on March 8 (Sun.), 2020 Contents: Exhibition of Japanese sake culture, sake sampling, food on sale *ID with photo is required for tasting *Samples are limited

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“Taiko no Tatsujin: Drum ‘n’ Fun!” Junior King Donkatsu Team

“Taiko no Tatujin” is a video game series which simulates the traditional Japanese “Taiko” Drum. We will have an exhibition by the winners of the “Taiko no Tatsujin eSports Competition” held in Japan. Be sure to stop by and watch these young champions show off their amazing technique and talent! esports Exhibition Match 3/7 Sat 4:00pm-5:00pm TBA Hawaii Convention Center Main Stage FREE PLAY 3/7 Sat 10:00am-2:00pm TBA 3/8 Sun 10:00pm-3:00pm TBA Hawaii Convention Center

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Planetarium by Bishop museum

Wayfinders (25min) 3/7(Sat) 10:30am, 12:30pm, 2:30pm, 4:30pm 3/8(Sun) 10:30am, 12:30pm This program puts you on the deck of the voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa as you explore traditional Polynesian navigation and find your own way to Tahiti from Hawaiʻi. Produced by Bishop Museum in collaboration with Polynesian Voyaging Society and 1001 Stories. The shorter version of our signature show. *Recommended for Ages 8 through Adult The Little Prince and The Star of Wish (14min) 3/7(Sat) 11:30am, 1:30pm, 3:30pm, 5:30pm 3/8(Sun) 11:30am, 1:30pm Long, long ago, a prince lives in a mysterious castle. He wants to catch a shooting star because he really wants his wish come true. He waits and waits for many nights by looking up at the sky, and finally the night sky filled with shooting stars comes. Can he make his wish come true? This is a heart-warming story of a prince who never gives up…… *Recommended for Elementary School Students

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JOY Kids’ Theater(Tokyo)<br>× OHANA ARTS(Hawaii)

Putting a smile on the world – Our theatre performance, delivered by the collaboration of children from Japan and Hawaii, expresses a prayer for the peaceful world without bullying, discrimination, and prejudice. For the last 25 years, Honolulu Festival has been involved in creating the opportunities for people of Japan and Hawaii to learn about each other’s history and culture, and facilitating genuine human interactions. For this year’s Honolulu Festival, we are organizing a collaborative theatre performance by the members of JOY Kids’ Theater from Japan and OHANA ARTS from Hawaii, where you can feel the strong friendship between Japan and Hawaii that the festival has helped establish. Please come see our performance that can be enjoyed by people across races and generations. [About JOY Kids’ Theater] Based in Tokyo and New York, JOY Kids’ Theater teaches musical theatre as a lifelong learning experience. Through the power of theatre, we help students from various generations develop skills to flourish as a global citizen. [About OHANA ARTS] For the 22nd Honolulu Festival, OHANA ARTS performed “Peace on Your Wings,” a musical inspired by the story of a girl named Sadako. It conveys the tragedy caused by atomic bombs, and the preciousness of world peace. Performance schedule: *3 shows in total ・2-3pm, 4-5pm on March 7 (Saturday) ・11am-12pm on March 8 (Sunday) Running time: 40 minutes Venue: Liliu Theater, #310 Hawaii Convention Center Admission: FREE As a part of the 26th Honolulu Festival, the special edition for the show features a chorus by casts from Japan and Hawaii. Please come and see our moving performance presented by children from across borders.

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Traditional Hawaiian Quilt

Anne’s Hawaiian Quilt (Anne) Poakalani Quilt Traditional Hawaiian art, Hawaiian Quilt. Appreciate the beauty in the large, symmetrical designs that make Hawaiian quilts unique. It is rare to see such a large collection of Hawaiian quilts in one location. Even when you visit museums and art galleries you may only see a small collection displayed. Stitch by stitch, each quilt is hand sewn with heartfelt care by the quilter. Each quilt exhibits a family’s history, a family’s story, Hawaiian culture and history. Take the time to view each quilt and be captivated by the story each one is conveying.

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Special movies by Kyoto Animation Studios!

The Japanese Film Festival, co-sponsored by the Consulate General of Japan in Honolulu, will take place at the Hawaii Convention Center on 3/7 (Sat) and 3/8 (Sun) as part of the annual Honolulu Festival. In addition to 4 of the signature Japanese movies, there will be special features of the must-see Liz and the Blue Bird and A Silent Voice by highly-acclaimed Kyoto Animation Studios. Admission is free! Please come and watch movies. Liz and the Blue Bird A Silent Voice

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Art + Flea, a pop up urban market will be coming to the Honolulu Festival!

Art+Flea, Hawaii’s favorite pop-up urban market & shopping destination is returning to Honolulu Festival! 40+ local designers, crafters, & artists featuring unique art, fashion, music, and more! Visit artandflea.com or follow @artandflea for more info.

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What’s New at the Honolulu Festival!

Children’s Craft Corner A Children’s Craft Corner hosted by Joy Shimabukuro of the Joy of Crafting show and sponsored by HouseMart Ben Franklin Crafts will offer a variety of fun craft activities for children of all ages and adults too! Make and take home your creations. Kapa Making Meet Kapa artist, Dalani Tanahy as she shares the history and demonstrate the art of kapa making at the Hawaii Convention Center. Kapa is made from the paper mulberry (Kozo) plant called wauke, the same plant that is used to make Japanese washi paper. Experience the art of traditional kapa making as you pound and decorate your own kapa cloth to take home. Shirone Giant Kites from Minami-ku, Niigata In the heart of Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, lies a small city called Shirone in Minami-ku where giant kites made of bamboo and washi paper are flown over the Nakanokuchi River during the Shirone Giant Battle Festival called Tako-kichi matsuri. Shirone’s giant kite craftsmen will demonstrate the art of making traditional giant kites at the Honolulu Festival. Festival attendees will have the opportunity to make their own miniature kites to take home. Planetarium Bishop Museum will host and sponsor a portable planetarium with the screening of Wayfinders, Waves, Wind and Stars. Wayfinding is the art of navigating a canoe across the ocean using the sun, moon, stars, wind and ocean swells. Watch this short documentary at the Hawaii Convention Center, 3rd floor – movie time varies.

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The History of Honolulu Festival

You can see graph magazines for past history of Honolulu festival. Click here for History of Graph magazine≫

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Peytynn Kubo of Maui High School awarded scholarship by The Japanese Cultural Society of Maui

The Japanese Cultural Society of Maui awarded $1,000 scholarship to Peytynn Kubo of Maui High School for  involvement and efforts in promoting the Japanese culture. Kubo has performed taiko for Zenshin Daiko for more than 10 years and now teaches and helps grow the organization. She served as president for the Maui High School Japanese Club since 2017 and led the club to win the Maui Mikoshi Design Contest this year, which allowed them to participate in the Honolulu Festival. Honolulu Festival congratulated Peytynn Kubo and had an interview. Q: We are so glad to hear that you won the award., Let us hear your thoughts about it. I am so grateful to have been awarded this scholarship. The Japanese Culture Society of Maui contributes so much to the perpetuation of Japanese culture and I’m so honored to have been recognized by such an amazing organization. Q: One of the reasons you to won the award was that you led the club to win the Maui Mikoshi Design Contest as the president of the Maui High School Japanese Club., How do you feel about it? Serving as Japanese Club President this year was such a fun and rewarding experience. My teacher and club advisor, Etsuko Nagahama, is such an inspiring role model and I’ve learned so much from her. Working with her and the other students from Japanese Club was so fun! We made lots of memories together while creating the Mikoshi and learned a lot about the deep history and influence of Japanese culture in Hawaii. Q: The Mikoshi was a beautiful, one-of-a-kind piece. What are some memorable moments during the creation process? While creating the Mikoshi, the memory that left the most impression was our club’s first Mikoshi meeting. Before designing the Mikoshi, we got together to think deeply about what the theme truly meant to us. As we talked about the theme, Looking Back to Create the Future, we discussed how vital it is for us to pay respect to our roots and preserve our traditions. Q: Please let us know your interests of Japan or Japanese culture. My interest with Japanese culture began when I started taiko at the age of six. I joined Zenshin Daiko in order to have a place where I could engage in my culture and channel my energy. The taiko dojo became my safe place and home, where I was able to be creative and find confidence within myself as an artist and person. Q: Through the Mikoshi, what did you wish to share with the world? Our main goal when designing the Mikoshi was to shine light on those who helped shape Hawai’i into the diverse and strong community that it is today. We wanted to reflect the immense responsibility we feel to continue the legacy of those who first immigrated to Hawaii and made the ultimate sacrifice in return for a better life. We are indebted to these people who left their family and lives of comfort behind and only looked ahead for not only their children, but for generations and generations to come.