26th Annual Honolulu Festival March 6-8, 2020

Archives 2011(17th)

Date : Mar 11 (Fri), Mar 12 (Sat), Mar 13 (Sun)
Sub Theme : We are all neighbors, around the world

Participating Performers
Honolulu Daijayama, Chibikko Daijayama, Hirosaki Neputa, Saitama Ryujin Matsuri Kai, Dai Hirai, SUGAREN, Hokkaido Ainu Culture, TAIKO KOZO, Ritsumeikan University dig up treasure, Alaska Native Heritage Center Dance Group, Descendance, Global Drums – Pangea, Inha University “ASSESS”, Hoku Zuttermeister, Dance Junction Hawaii, Hawaii United Okinawa Association, and more.

Educational Program

The Educational Program: Educational School Tour

2011(17th)

The Educational School Tour was the first event, where the local schools were invited. It was held at 9:00 a.m. at the Hawaii Convention Center.

Special

Special Event: Cultural Exchange with the Indigenous Groups and the Peace Dance

2011(17th)

The 17th Annual Honolulu Festival hosted a special collaborative event with various indigenous groups on Saturday, March 12. Those groups included the Alaska Native Heritage Center Dancers from Alaska, Descendance from Australia and Hokkaido Ainu Culture from Japan.

Special

Hawaii Music Festivals 2011

2011(17th)

The Hawaii Music Festivals was held at the 17th Annual Honolulu Festival. It consisted of 3 festivals which are Hawaii Choral Festival, Hawaii Band & Orchestra Festival and Hawaii Cheer & Dance Festival. Also, schools from the U.S. mainland, Hawaii, Canada and Japan participated.

Special

The Friendship Gala: Expanding Friendships through Cultural Exchange

2011(17th)

The Friendship Gala is an event for people from countries of the Asia-Pacific region such as Hawaii and Japan to foster international goodwill and establish relations with the locals.

Share Your Voice

“Share Your Voice” Project 2011

2011(17th)

The “Share Your Voice Project” is an educational program between the Honolulu Festival Foundation and students of Kapiolani Community College. Its purpose is for the students to report on the attractiveness of the Honolulu Festival through their own experience to the world by utilizing live stream technology. There were 38 students that participated this year. The scenes of the festival were live-streamed from 2 different locations unlike last year, which was done only from one location. In addition, the students utilized the social media such as Facebook and Twitter to introduce the atmosphere of the festival in Japanese, English and Korean. [ Read more ] 

Stage

Once again tons of performances were shown on stage!

2011(17th)

The performers from various countries such as Japan, Hawaii and others performed on stage!

Educational Program

Educational School Tour 2011

2011(17th)

The Educational School Tour was the first event of the Honolulu Festival, where the local schools in Oahu were invited on Friday, March 11, at the Hawaii Convention Center. [ Read more ] 

Educational Program

The 8th Annual Maui Mikoshi Design Contest

2011(17th)

Once again Maui High School won the 8th Annual Maui Mikoshi Design Contest. The participating students were different from last year, which they studied the history of mikoshi and learned about Japanese culture. There were a total of 18 students that are learning about Japan as well as the Japanese language at Maui High School. Furthermore, the mikoshi designed by the students expressed a hope for world peace with the sub-theme of this year’s festival “We are all neighbors, around the world”. The Concept of Design There is a dove on the very top which symbolizing “peace” and “harmony”. Also, there is a dove positioned on each side of the roof which is carrying two different flags. Moreover, there was an illustration of earth which the lands and sea were designed. In addition, there were name of countries and their capitals decorated on the four corner of the roof.         The Kanji letter that symbolizes “family” (族) is designed as an emblem on the center of the roof. Furthermore, there were designs of shining rising sun, cherry blossom and carp at the front and back of the body, which they symbolizing Japan. In contrast, there were Hawaiian designs such as moon, hibiscus and Hawaii state fish Humuhumunukunukuapua’a were drawn on the left and right side of the mikoshi. In addition, there was an illustration of fishing net and people by the pedestal in which they symbolizing human unity. Finally, our sub-theme “We are all neighbors, around the world” was put up on the pillar.         Interview with Etsuko Nagahama, a teacher from Maui High School

Parade

The Grand Parade United People from Various Countries as One

2011(17th)

The 17th Annual Honolulu Festival was held for 3-days from Friday, March 11 through Sunday, March 13. The Grand Parade was held on the final day on Kalakaua Avenue from 4:30p.m. This year’s Nagaoka Fireworks got canceled due to the Great East Japan Earthquake. It is known as one of the highlighted events at the Honolulu Festival every year. However, the officials of Nagaoka City couldn’t make a visit to Hawaii. Also, there were many participating groups from Japan that were affected by the disaster, which their shows were also canceled. Hence we altered some parts of the program to adjust the schedule. The Grand Parade Began with Great Anticipation The spectators were already gathered by the roadside from an hour before the opening. They were waiting for the parade in the heat, where the sunlight was still intense even though the sun was starting to set. The opening performance was held in the Performance Area, which was set up on the streets of Kalakaua Avenue before the parade. Dai Hirai and the children of Niu Valley Middle School Concert Band performed a theme song for the Honolulu Festival titled ONE LOVE ~Pacific Harmony~ in front of Moana Surfrider, A Westin Resort & Spa where the special guests were present. It was followed by the cheerleading team of Inha University from Korea, which they showed vigorous dancing performance.   After the opening performance, the parade officially began with a police motorcycle barricade which led the parading routes. One of the famous ukulele players, Jake Shimabukuro made the first appearance this year. He was in a convertible holding his ukulele in one hand. Also, he offered to do a charity concert to help raise funds for the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake. He said he thought of ways that he can contribute in which he concluded to hold a concert. Next appeared was the Mayor of Honolulu, Peter Carlisle. Then followed by the performance of the Okinawan sanshin and drums led by Choichi Terukina, who is a founder of Ryokyu Koten Afuso-ryu Ongaku Kenkyu Choichikai in which he is recognized as a Living National Treasure of Japan. Their Okinawan rhythm brought excitement to the parade. Various Countries of the Asia-Pacific Region Gathered in Honolulu There were participating groups from various countries of the Asia-Pacific region such as China, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Philippine, Australia, Samoa, Alaska and Japan. One of the appeals of the Honolulu Festival is that the guest can enjoy variety of cultural dances, music and garments just by watching the parade. In addition, there were many dancing performances such as the hula dance, yosakoi dance, modern dance and cheerleading dance. Also, the cultural performances were performed such as the Japanese traditional art called Nankin Tamasudare. Reaching to the Victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake from Honolulu The Great East Japan Earthquake had occurred the day before the 17th Annual Honolulu Festival and Japan was hit by tsunami. The moment of silence was given for those victims before the parade. Everybody including the spectators gave their silent prayers. Also, the fundraising activity was held in between times. Many reached their hands to make a donation. Furthermore, there were groups that raised money on their own during the festival period. A lot of people gave their warm support to raise the donation at the 17th Annual Honolulu Festival.   The Honolulu Festival Presents Jake Shimabukuro’s Charity Concert for the Japan-Hawaii Relief Fund  Jake Shimabukuro’s Charity Concert for the Japan-Hawaii Relief Fund was held after the Grand Parade. Despite of a sudden event, there were 800 people gathered by the Waikiki Beach Walk where the show took place. Also, Manoa DNA and Dai Hirai agreed to participate in the concert. The concert was only held for about an hour however, it raised $15,000. We would like to express our appreciation for your donation. We will continue to raise money for the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake through our Honolulu Festival’s website. Thank you very much for all your support! [ Honolulu Festival: Donations for Tohoku Kanto Earthquake Victims ]

Educational Program

Interview with Teacher Etsuko Nagahama, 8th Annual Maui Mikoshi Design Contest Winner Maui High School

2011(17th)

Q: What was the process including timeline that that you applied with your students to produce your winning Maui Mikoshi design for the 8th Annual Competition? I mentioned the Mikoshi contest to my Japanese club officers and they were excited about entering the contest to defend their title as Mikoshi design winners. I showed the Japanese club students a video on “Japanese Festivals” and explained to them what it is, and about the Mikoshi contest. Subsequently, my Japanese club students were enthusiastic and determined to enter the contest without hesitating. It was the possibility of winning the contest and marching in the Honolulu Festival parade. We only had two and half weeks to come up with the design, my students met every day during the school week (during their lunch time) in my classroom. At first, my students brainstormed this year’s theme, “We are Neighbors around the World.” The ideas were categorized according to what part of the Mikoshi they were going to be. Then they voted on which idea will be best for a cretin part of the Mikoshi based on the theme. The students were allowed to vote once per category. The most popular idea was the walls with two parallel sides that had a koi fish, and the other two parallel sides with the Humuhumunukunukuapuaa. The students went over each and every idea and eliminated the minority voted ideas that didn’t fit the theme. When they finish with the ideas and brainstorming, the officers place the students in groups of three or four to draw parts of the Mikoshi containing their ideas. After we finish drawing we had one of my officer and a few students that is in graphic designing using Photoshop to illustrate the design. At the end, we successfully finish with a smile.   Q: What are some of the ideas that came up from the students when discussing the sub-theme “We are Neighbors around the World?” Our main objective was to have countries around the world that shows harmony and passion by showing customs and common ground that they all share. We based everything on what all countries have like flags, languages/writing, and people but also on what they share like the world and peace/harmony (which the dove represents). When we put all the ideas together it shows we are all neighbors around the world. We had many different countries with their flags on the corners of the roof and have different writing on the poles. We place the net people that are holding hands draping down to show that everyone are friends here on this earth. In this world we share the earth, so the world is mapped on the roof to show all countries are together as one. The dove on top the roof shows the peace and harmony around the world. This design also has a story behind the ideas. From top to bottom shows the peace and harmony of the world, then branch off to the countries around the world which the flags and the writing represents, as it comes down to the walls its shows the friendship between Hawaii and Japan, and last comes to the net people around the world to show unity to all. In choosing what we put on the Mikoshi we made sure that the objective chosen is a mainstay of the world’s harmony, unity, and tranquility of being neighbors. Q: What are some of the “hot” topics that your students really get into when teaching the Japanese language and culture? My students look forward to learning about how the Japanese culture differs from their own culture here in America. Things like festivals and holidays really interest the students. They enjoy discovering the different traditions that take place in Japan. When we are covering the culture notes at the end of every lesson it becomes the talk of the class. Not to mention, the language is an enjoyable subject that the students like to dive into. Creating the mikoshi design created a fun learning environment for the students. After finishing the design they gained knowledge about the history, celebrations and norms of the Japanese culture. Q: What do you think that the students get most out of participating in this event? What the students get out of participating in this event is the first-hand experience of creating and partaking in a Japanese related event. Our newer students who haven’t joined us last year in the parade have gained knowledge through the introductory and creation of this project to learn about what a Mikoshi is. So it’s a learning experience as well. Also, the students learned about how to use time considerately when working together to create the Mikoshi and that really helped the designing event deem enjoyable for everyone.

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